ARQ National Psychotrauma Centre

English

Changes in trauma-related cognitions predict subsequent symptom improvement during prolonged exposure in patients with childhood abuse-related PTSD

Change in negative posttraumatic cognitions is a proposed mechanism through which Prolonged Exposure (PE) leads to symptom reduction of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). A strong case for posttraumatic cognitions as a change mechanism in PTSD treatment can be made by establishing temporal precedence of change in cognitions. The current study examines the temporal relationship between change in posttraumatic cognitions and PTSD symptoms during PE, using the Posttraumatic Cognitions Inventory.

A grounded theory study on the dynamics of parental grief during the children's end of life

Aim

Parents are increasingly confronted with loss during their child's end of life. Healthcare professionals struggle with parental responses to loss. This study aimed to understand parental coping with grief during their child's end of life.

 

Methods

The Ambiguous Loss Inventory Plus (ALI+) : Introduction of a Measure of Psychological Reactions to the Disappearance of a Loved One

Background: The disappearance of a significant person is an ambiguous loss due to the persistent uncertainty about the whereabouts of the person. Measures specifically capturing the psychological consequences of ambiguous loss are lacking. Therefore, this study aimed to develop the Ambiguous Loss Inventory Plus (ALI+) and evaluated its suitability for use with relatives of missing persons.

 

‘Where am I in all of this?’ Impact of a morally injurious mission on the home front of Dutchbat III military Veterans

Research has shown time and time again that war has an impact on the mental well-being of Veterans and their families. But what does that impact look like when a mission is characterized by severe violations of norms and values (in other words, moral injury)? In this study, family members of Dutch Veterans talked about the impact on their lives of a mission gone bad in the former Yugoslavia, 25 years after it happened.

Social capital-based mental health interventions for refugees : Ukraine and beyond.

New knowledge about social capital and mental health for refugees is particularly timely in light of the current Ukrainian refugee situation. Several European countries, typically more accustomed to funding large-scale refugee aid operations on other continents, find themselves receiving and providing primary aid to waves of Ukrainian refugees. The United Nations estimates that more than 6.8 million people have left Ukraine (as of 29 May 20221), and 7.1 million have been internally displaced (as of 23 May 20222); the actual totals have likely increased in subsequent months.

Editorial : Emerging treatments and approaches for moral injury and moral distress

Current evidence-based therapies to treat trauma-affected populations, especially military members and first responders, have had variable success. Treatment response may be impeded by a lack of clinical attention to moral aspects of psychotrauma.

Incidence and Severity of Sexual Harassment, and its Impact on Mental Health in a Cohort of International Humanitarian Field-Workers

To date, there have been no cohort studies of sexual harassment incidence and its relation to mental health within humanitarian field-workers. Research among numerous occupations suggests an association between workplace sexual harassment and several health complaints.

 

Peer-provided psychological intervention for Syrian refugees : results of a randomised controlled trial on the effectiveness of Problem Management Plus

Background

The mental health burden among refugees in high-income countries (HICs) is high, whereas access to mental healthcare can be limited.

 

Objective

To examine the effectiveness of a peer-provided psychological intervention (Problem Management Plus; PM+) in reducing symptoms of common mental disorders (CMDs) among Syrian refugees in the Netherlands.

 

Methods

Combatting intergenerational effects of psychotrauma with multifamily therapy

There is growing evidence that parental trauma is associated with psychosocial disorders, externalizing and internalizing problems, and higher sensitivity to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in children. Recent research findings suggest multidimensional relational, psychological, and neurobiological interrelated pathways of intergenerational influence. Moreover, the intergenerational effects of parental trauma need to be understood within a broader systemic context, as a part of family adaptation.

 

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