ARQ National Psychotrauma Centre

English

Severity profiles of posttraumatic stress, depression, anxiety, and somatization symptoms in treatment seeking traumatized refugees

Background: Western countries are facing many challenges hosting refugees from several regions in the world. Many of them are severely traumatized and suffer from a variety of mental health symptoms, which complicates the identification and treatment of refugees at risk. This study examined subgroups based on a broad range of psychopathology, and several predictors, including trauma characteristics and gender. 

Pharmacological Prevention of PTSD: Current Evidence for Clinical Practice

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a disabling psychiatric disorder that develops in approximately 10% of people exposed to trauma. As traumatic events are the point of reference for PTSD symptom onset, the first hours to weeks posttrauma provide opportunities for preventive interventions. In this article, we discuss current evidence on pharmacological preventive interventions for PTSD in adults. We conclude that there are no pharmacological preventive interventions that are ready for routine clinical practice.

Toward a Better Understanding of Psychological Symptoms in People Confronted With the Disappearance of a Loved One: A Systematic Review

Objective:

The disappearance of a loved one is claimed to be the most stressful type of loss. The present review explores the empirical evidence relating to this claim. Specifically, it summarizes studies exploring the prevalence and correlates of psychological symptoms in relatives of missing persons as well as studies comparing levels of psychopathology in relatives of the disappeared and the deceased.

 

Method:

Comparison of six proposed diagnostic criteria sets for disturbed grief

Increased recognition that grief may turn into a disorder led to the inclusion of Persistent Complex Bereavement Disorder (PCBD) in DSM-5 and Prolonged Grief Disorder (PGD) in ICD-11. Four additional criteria sets for disturbed grief have been proposed in recent years: Prigerson et al. proposed criteria for PGD (“PGD-2009″), Maercker et al. presented an ICD-11 beta draft version of PGD (“PGD-BD”), Shear et al. put forth criteria for complicated grief (“CG”), and, recently, criteria for PGD in DSM-5-TR have been proposed.

The prevalence of prolonged grief disorder in bereaved individuals following unnatural losses: Systematic review and meta regression analysis

Background: Previous research has indicated that one out of ten naturally bereaved individuals develops prolonged grief disorder (PGD). Less is known about the prevalence of PGD following unnatural deaths, such as accidents, disasters, suicides, or homicides. The aim of this study was to compute the pooled prevalence of PGD and to determine possible causes of its varied estimates.

Severity profiles of posttraumatic stress, depression, anxiety, and somatization symptoms in treatment seeking traumatized refugees

Background: Western countries are facing many challenges hosting refugees from several regions in the world. Many of them are severely traumatized and suffer from a variety of mental health symptoms, which complicates the identification and treatment of refugees at risk. This study examined subgroups based on a broad range of psychopathology, and several predictors, including trauma characteristics and gender.

Commemoration of disruptive events: a scoping review about posttraumatic stress reactions and related factors

Collective commemoration in response to war or disaster is widespread across time and cultures. It is assumed to support those affected by the disruptive event to cope with their experiences. However, the actual relationship between commemoration and mental health outcomes is complicated and evidence of healing effects remains elusive. By applying a scoping review approach, this article maps empirical studies that focus on commemoration from a psychological perspective.

Exposure to combat and deployment; reviewing the military context in The Netherlands

This paper reviews the military context of exposure to combat and deployment in Dutch soldiers. It does so by reviewing war victims and military psychiatry after WWII in the Netherlands, and describes Dutch deployments from the late 1970s to the present. ‘Who is the Dutch soldier’ is asked to articulate the mental load on the individual soldier before, during, and after deployment.

Discontinuation Rates of Antidepressant Use by Dutch Soldiers

Introduction: Soldiers have a higher risk for developing psychiatric disorders that require treatment; often with antidepressants. However, antidepressants as well as the psychiatric disorder, may influence military readiness in several ways. In the general population, early discontinuation of antidepressant treatment is often seen. It is yet unknown whether this occurs to a similar extent in soldiers. The objective of this study was to evaluate discontinuation of antidepressant use by Dutch soldiers in the first 12 months after start and determinants thereof.

Regions of white matter abnormalities in the arcuate fasciculus in veterans with anger and aggression problems

Aggression after military deployment is a common occurrence in veterans. Neurobiological research has shown that aggression is associated with a dysfunction in a network connecting brain regions implicated in threat processing and emotion regulation. However, aggression may also be related to deficits in networks underlying communication and social cognition. The uncinate and arcuate fasciculi are integral to these networks, thus studying potential abnormalities in these white matter connections can further our understanding of anger and aggression problems in military veterans.

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