Veterans’ perspectives on discussing moral injury in the context of evidence‐based psychotherapies for PTSD and other VA treatment

Objective

We examined Veterans’ perspectives on discussing moral injury in veterans affairs (VA) evidence‐based psychotherapies (EBPs) for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other VA treatment.

Methods

Fourteen male warzone veterans (ages 25–74) who completed an EBP for PTSD within the past year participated in semistructured interviews related to discussing moral injury in VA treatment (e.g., EBPs for PTSD, chaplaincy). Qualitative interviews were evaluated using a thematic analysis.

Results

“We Decided the Museum Would Be the Best Place for Them”: Veterans, Families and Mementos of the First World War

Although it is generally considered that there was relatively little interest in the First World War throughout the 1970s and 1980s in Britain, these decades constitute a key moment in time when the embodied memories of the war transitioned into the cultural memory we are familiar with today. This article examines the transmission of memories of the First World War from veterans and their families to museums.

Bosnian Post-War Transgenerational Trauma and Its Impact on Post-War Born Children

Numerous scholars attempted to investigate the phenomenon of transgenerational impact of war-related trauma on the offsprings,and came with both conflicting and matching evidence. First studies emerged around Holocaust transgenerational trauma, expanding to other war-related cases as twentieth century progressed.

International meta-analysis of PTSD genome-wide association studies identifies sex- and ancestryspecific genetic risk loci

The risk of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following trauma is heritable, but robust common variants have yet to be identified. In a multi-ethnic cohort including over 30,000 PTSD cases and 170,000 controls we conduct a genome-wide association study of PTSD. We demonstrate SNP-based heritability estimates of 5–20%, varying by sex. Three genome-wide significant loci are identified, 2 in European and 1 in African-ancestry analyses. Analyses stratified by sex implicate 3 additional loci in men.

Intergenerational consequences of the Holocaust on offspring mental health : a systematic review of associated factors and mechanisms

Exposure to war and violence has major consequences for society at large, detrimental impact on people’s individual lives, and may also have intergenerational consequences. To gain more insight into these intergenerational consequences, research addressing the impact of the Holocaust on offspring is an important source of information. The aim of the current study was to systematically review the mechanisms of intergenerational consequences by summarizing characteristics in Holocaust survivors and their offspring suggested to impact the offspring’s mental health.

Cohort profile: the Prospective Research In Stress-Related Military Operations (PRISMO) study in the Dutch Armed Forces

Purpose: The Prospective Research in Stress-Related Military Operations (PRISMO) study was initiated to gain a better understanding of the long-term impact of military deployment on mental health, and to map the different biological and psychological factors that contribute to the development of stress-related mental health symptoms.

'You Engage and Then You See' : The Battle of the Java Sea from a Japanese Perspective

The Battle of the Java Sea in 1942 was a major victory for the Imperial Japanese Navy. The recently published Senshi Sösho volume 26, The Operation of the Navy in the Dutch East Indies and the Bay of Bengal, contains translated Japanese sources which give insight into Japanese tactics and the Naval Command's appreciation of the battle. The course of the battle proved to be a rude awakening for the Japanese as it put their whole outranging tactic and torpedo tactic into question.

Taking Action : What We Can Learn From Resistance

In this long read, we will investigate how people shape their behaviour in an authoritarian society.

When do they adapt, and when do they think things go too far? What do they consider to be opportunities, or as too much of a risk? To what extent are they prepared (or not) to adjust their previous ideas about right and wrong?

Primarily using examples from the period immediately before and after the Second World War, but also from later in the twentieth century, we look for the small everyday negotiations of people in authoritarian systems, and what we can learn from them.

Stop the War on Children : Protecting Children in 21st Century Conflict

The nature of conflict has changed, putting children in the frontline in new and terrible ways. Wars are lasting longer. They are more likely to be fought in urban areas amongst civilian populations leading to deaths and life-changing injuries, and laying waste to the infrastructure needed to guarantee access to food and water. Attacks on schools and hospitals are up. The denial of humanitarian aid is used as yet another weapon of war. The international rules and basic standards of conduct that exist to protect civilians in conflict are being flouted with impunity.

 

RomArchive : the Digital Archive of the Roma

Starting in January 2019, RomArchive, the Digital Archive of the Roma, will make the arts and cultures of Roma visible and illustrate their contribution to European cultural history. Through counternarratives told by Roma themselves, RomArchive will create a reliable source of knowledge that will be accessible internationally on the internet to counteract stereotypes and prejudices with facts.

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