Psychotraumanet: information portal about critical indicents

Psychotraumanet provides access to information about critical incidents. You can find (scientific) articles, interviews, film and audio fragments and news from the media. On Psychotraumanet, the information is divided into ten themes: World War II, resilience & organization, disasters & crises, aggression management, screening & diagnostics, evidence based treatment, complex trauma, child& family, trauma & diversity and humanitarian emergencies.

 

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Increasing Family Safety and Decreasing Parental Stress and Child’s Social-Emotional Problems with Resolutions Approach: a Single-Case Experimental Design Study Protocol

The present study describes a Single-Case Experimental Design (SCED) research protocol. The outlined research is aimed at investigating the effectiveness and potential mechanisms of the Resolutions Approach (RA), a multidisciplinary intervention to stop child abuse and enhance safety in the families. Given the heterogeneity of the population and innovativeness of the topic, a SCED with a baseline period (A-phase) followed by a treatment period (B-phase) is designed.

Patterns of Recovery From Early Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms After a Preventive Intervention With Oxytocin: Hormonal Contraception Use Is a Prognostic Factor

In a previous issue of Biological Psychiatry, we reported on the efficacy of repeated intranasal oxytocin administration early after emergency department admission in preventing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, assessed 1.5, 3, and 6 months posttrauma (1). In a randomized, placebocontrolled trial, we demonstrated beneficial effects in patients with high symptom levels before treatment onset (1,2).

Early discontinuation of counselling by survivors of family violence in Papua New Guinea

Family and sexual violence are common and widespread in Papua New Guinea, especially against women. The author describes her reflections about reviewing the psychosocial support mode of intervention according to the needs of survivors of family violence at the Family Support Centre within Tari Hospital in the southern highlands of the Hela Province, while working as a psychologist supervisor from 2011 to 2012. It draws on a feedback exercise with survivors, intended to ask about their satisfaction with services and the reasons for not returning for follow-up counselling sessions.

Psychological first aid for children during the Kumamoto earthquake disaster response in Japan

The following field report is based on lessons learned from the adaptation and utilisation of the Psychological First Aid for Child Practitioners (Save the Children, 2013) materials in Japan. Psychological first aid (PFA) is a set of skills and competencies that help reduce the initial distress of children and caregivers due to accidents, natural disasters, conflicts or other critical incidents. The manual was developed by Save the Children based on Psychological First Aid: A Guide for Field Workers (World Health Organization, War Trauma Foundation and World Vision International, 2011).

Higher education and forced migration: An evaluation of psychosocial support provided for Syrian refugees and the Jordanian host community

Access to higher education as well as obtaining an academic degree is burdensome for Syrian refugees and socially disadvantaged Jordanians. The two social groups also show an increased vulnerability to mental disorders. The present study evaluates if the provided psychosocial support is socially and emotionally helpful for 75 students (35 Syrian refugees; 40 socially disadvantaged Jordanians) in a scholarship programme for Masters studies in Jordan. Both social groups were expected to report vulnerability to depression and anxiety. Females were assumed to be more vulnerable.

The impact of psychosocial support on well-being and agency within an inclusive livelihood programme

After 7 years of a multifaceted conflict, effective humanitarian assistance for people living in Syria is vital. This action research exploresthe extentto which psychosocial support (PSS) impacts the well-being and agency of Syrian farmers benefitting from livelihood. Our methodology used a baseline and endline surveytowards a target population of households receiving agricultural inputs, with both an experimental and control group. Five dimensions of well-being were considered: emotional, social, economic, skills and knowledge and overall feeling. The key findings are:

Geographies of adolescent distress: A need for a community-based psychosocial care system in Nepal

This paper presents the findings of an ethnographic study conducted among high school students in Nepal. Participant observations, in-depth interviews and focused group discussions were conducted among 35 students (20 girls and 15 boys). The findings suggest three geographies (home, school and community), where adolescents experience distress. Common experiences of adolescent distress included discrimination, domestic violence, heavy workload, poverty, bullying, physical punishment, unsupportive behaviour of the parents and teachers and a lack of basic materials.

The case for—and challenges of—faith-sensitive psychosocial programming

Drawing upon evidence compiled in a recent literature review, we identify five arguments for seeking faith-sensitivity in psychosocial programming: it is indicated by the Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC) Guidelines on Mental Health and Psychosocial Support (MHPSS); it is implied by humanitarian law and principles; religion is an active and effective source of coping in many contexts; local faith actors have a ‘comparative advantage’ in humanitarian settings; and engaging with religion is coherent with emerging policy and practice.

Project MIRACLE: Increasing empathy among psychosocial support staff working with refugees through brief training in motivational interviewing

Motivational interviewing (MI) is presented as a mental health and psychosocial support (MHPSS) approach for increasing empathy among psychosocial support staff working with refugees in resettlement. In a pilot study, 34 case managers in US refugee resettlement non-governmental organizations (NGOs) were trained in MI in a 3-h webinar format using a randomized controlled trial with a wait-list condition. Outcome was measured using the Helpful Responses to Refugees Questionnaire, which assesses empathetic responses to common refugee scenarios.

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