On the relativity of the mental health consequences of disasters

What makes individuals, communities, and societies resilient or vulnerable to a disaster from a mental health perspective? How should the causes and consequences of resilience and vulnerability be addressed? These questions delineate the scope of this book.
The first part of the book describes patterns in exposure to adversity, mental health, cultural and socioeconomic characteristics, and professional psychosocial service capacity across country contexts. 

The organization of post-disaster psychosocial support in the Netherlands : a meta-synthesis

 

 

Background: Despite numerous calls for a more evidence-based provision of post-disaster psychosocial support, systematic analyses of post-disaster service delivery are scarce.

 

 

Objective: The aim of this review was to evaluate the organization of post-disaster psychosocial support in different disaster settings and to identify determinants.

 

 

A longitudinal evaluation of active outreach after an aeroplane crash : screening for post-traumatic stress disorder and depression and assessment of self-reported treatment needs

 

Background: In 2009, an aeroplane crashed near Amsterdam. To remedy unmet mental health needs, active outreach was used to identify victims at risk for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression.

 

Objective: The active outreach strategy was evaluated by examining the accuracy of screening methods in predicting PTSD and depression, self-reported treatment needs, and the extent to which perceived treatment needs predict trajectories of PTSD.

 

Disaster Exercises to Prepare Hospitals for Mass-Casualty Incidents : Does it Contribute to Preparedness or is it Ritualism?

Introduction
The central question this study sought to answer was whether the team members of Strategic Crisis Teams (SCTs) participating in mass-casualty incident (MCI) exercises in the Netherlands learn from their participation.

 

The neural dynamics of deficient memory control in heavily traumatized refugees

Victims of war, torture and natural catastrophes are prone to develop posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). These individuals experience the recurrent, involuntary intrusion of traumatic memories. What neurocognitive mechanisms are driving this memory disorder?

Children and natural disasters

The number of children affected by natural disasters each year is alarmingly high and can be expected to rise as climate change continues. The mental consequences have been documented not only in the rates of post-traumatic stress symptoms and post-traumatic stress disorder, but also for depression and other mental health problems.

Climate Change and Health

Climate change and the impacts on health are being increasingly reported and documented. It is expected that with continued rises in global temperature and greenhouse gas emissions the effects on health will become more widely experienced and extreme. Throughout July PLOS Medicine is publishing a Special Issue on climate change and health. Guest edited by Dr. Jonathan Patz (University of Wisconsin-Madison) and Dr.

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