PTSD in the elderly : the interaction between trauma and aging

Background: Because an increasingly large cohort of individuals is approaching their elderly years, there is concern about how the healthcare system will cope with the greater demands placed upon it. One area of concern is the impact of trauma and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the aged. Although several reviews have highlighted the lack of knowledge and research on the topic, there still remain gaps in the literature. Nevertheless, some recent behavioral, endocrinological and neuroimaging studies may provide new insights into the discussion.

Late-onset PTSD in unaccompanied refugee minors: Exploring the predictive utility of depression and anxiety symptoms

Following resettlement in Western countries, unaccompanied refugee minors (URM) are at risk of developing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). It is unclear to what extent PTSD in this group may become manifest at later stages following resettlement and which factors are associated with late onset. We examined data from URM collected 1 (T1) and 2 years (T2) following resettlement for differences between groups with no PTSD, PTSD at T1, and late-onset PTSD (at T2 only) using multinomial regression and path analysis.

Parental Response to Child Injury : Examination of Parental Posttraumatic Stress Symptom Trajectories Following Child Accidental Injury

Objective: Trajectory analyses were used to empirically differentiate patterns of posttraumatic stress symptoms in parents following child accidental injury and explore the relationship between parent and child recovery patterns.

Method: Parent (n = 189) self-reported symptoms from acute to 2 years post accident were examined to (1) identify distinct parent symptom trajectories; (2) identify risk factors; and (3) explore the patterns of children and parents together.

Measuring Posttraumatic Stress Reactions in Children: A Preliminary Validation of the Children's Responses to Trauma Inventory

The Children's Responses to Trauma Inventory (CRTI) is a self-report measure for posttraumatic stress reactions in children. We validated the original CRTI through secondary data analysis of four clinical and nonclinical samples (N = 96) and expert consultation. After revision, the CRTI was further validated in 8- to 12-year-old traumatized children in the general population (N = 243). The original CRTI showed moderate to excellent reliability and both convergent and discriminant validity, but it also had limitations in formulation and scope of the items.

Can Asylum-Seekers with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Be Successfully Treated? A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

Rates of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are exceptionally high among asylum-seekers. Reportedly, stressors caused by the asylum procedure and psychological consequences of torture contribute to the maintenance of symptoms and interfere with treatment. In a pilot randomized controlled trial, the authors examined the efficacy of trauma-focused treatment in 32 asylum-seekers with PTSD resulting from state-sponsored violence and other traumatic events. Narrative exposure therapy (NET) was compared with treatment as usual (TAU), with a focus on stabilization and psychoactive medication.

Asylum seekers'perspectives on their mental health and views on health and social services: contributions for service provision using a mixed-methods approach

The literature tends to use ‘asylum seeker’ and ‘refugee’ interchangeably, creating uncertainty about the mental health of asylum seekers. However, asylum seekers occupy a unique position in British society which differentiates them from people with refugee status and which may have implications for their mental health. For example, ‘asylum seekers’ are supported and accommodated in dispersal areas under the National Asylum Support Service and they are not entitled to work.

Intercultural Dimensions in the Treatment of Traumatized Refugee Families

This article conceptualizes problems of traumatized refugee families and describes therapeutic work that seeks to transcend dilemmas and tensions arising within the discourses on culture, trauma, and treatment. Several options for treatment that help avoid the usual traps and pitfalls in trauma treatment of culturally diverse populations are presented and discussed.

Moral injury and moral repair in war veterans : A preliminary model and intervention strategy

Throughout history,warriors have been confronted with moral and ethical challenges and modern unconventional and guerilla wars amplify these challenges. Potentially morally injurious events, such as perpetrating, failing to prevent, or bearing witness to acts that transgress deeply held moral beliefs and expectationsmay be deleterious in the long-term, emotionally, psychologically, behaviorally, spiritually, and socially (what we label as moral injury).

Long-term legacies of war: An outline of a study among a Post World War II generation of clients receiving psychotherapeutic treatment in Foundation Centrum '45, the Netherlands

Introduction

“Camp is not so much a place as a condition. “I’ve had camp,” he says. That makes him different from us. We’ve had chicken pox and German measles. And after Simon fell out of a tree, he got concussion and he had to stay in bed for weeks. But we never had camp.“

- Nightfather, Carl Friedman; novel about a man’s experiences in the Nazi concentration camps as seen through the eyes of his children -

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