The temporal dynamics of symptoms during exposure therapies of PTSD : a network approach

Background: Analysis of dynamic (temporal) networks allows an identification of important targets of treatment.

Objective: This study examined the dynamic network of symptoms in patients diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) during exposure therapy.

Risk factors for violence-related injuries in emergency departments : a Danish linkage study

Background: Interpersonal violence is a pervasive global public health problem associated with myriad health, social and economic consequences. In recent years the rates of interpersonal violence have decreased, however, high numbers of individuals continue to present to emergency departments for non-fatal violence-related injuries. Objective: This study aimed to examine a range of risk factors associated with violencerelated injuries in an emergency department in Denmark.

Exposure to combat and deployment; reviewing the military context in The Netherlands

This paper reviews the military context of exposure to combat and deployment in Dutch soldiers. It does so by reviewing war victims and military psychiatry after WWII in the Netherlands, and describes Dutch deployments from the late 1970s to the present. ‘Who is the Dutch soldier’ is asked to articulate the mental load on the individual soldier before, during, and after deployment.

Discontinuation Rates of Antidepressant Use by Dutch Soldiers

Introduction: Soldiers have a higher risk for developing psychiatric disorders that require treatment; often with antidepressants. However, antidepressants as well as the psychiatric disorder, may influence military readiness in several ways. In the general population, early discontinuation of antidepressant treatment is often seen. It is yet unknown whether this occurs to a similar extent in soldiers. The objective of this study was to evaluate discontinuation of antidepressant use by Dutch soldiers in the first 12 months after start and determinants thereof.

Regions of white matter abnormalities in the arcuate fasciculus in veterans with anger and aggression problems

Aggression after military deployment is a common occurrence in veterans. Neurobiological research has shown that aggression is associated with a dysfunction in a network connecting brain regions implicated in threat processing and emotion regulation. However, aggression may also be related to deficits in networks underlying communication and social cognition. The uncinate and arcuate fasciculi are integral to these networks, thus studying potential abnormalities in these white matter connections can further our understanding of anger and aggression problems in military veterans.

Individual prediction of psychotherapy outcome in posttraumatic stress disorder using neuroimaging data

Trauma-focused psychotherapy is the first-line treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) but 30–50% of patients do not benefit sufficiently. We investigated whether structural and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI/rs-fMRI) data could distinguish between treatment responders and non-responders on the group and individual level. Forty-four male veterans with PTSD underwent baseline scanning followed by traumafocused psychotherapy.

Altered white matter microstructural organization in posttraumatic stress disorder across 3047 adults : results from the PGC-ENIGMA PTSD consortium

A growing number of studies have examined alterations in white matter organization in people with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) using diffusion MRI (dMRI), but the results have been mixed, which may be partially due to relatively small sample sizes among studies. Altered structural connectivity may be both a neurobiological vulnerability for, and a result of, PTSD.

A decennial review of psychotraumatology : what did we learn and where are we going?

On 6 December 2019 we start the 10th year of the European Journal of Psychotraumatogy (EJPT), a full Open Access journal on psychotrauma. This editorial is part of a special issue/ collection celebrating the 10 years anniversary of the journal where we will acknowledge some of our most impactful articles of the past decade (also discussed below and marked with * in the reference list). In this editorial the editors present a decennial review of the field addressing a range of topics that are core to both the journal and to psychotraumatology as a discipline.

Prevalence of non-specific symptoms in livestock dense areas : looking beyond respiratory conditions

Background: A large body of studies showed that prevalence of respiratory health problems is higher when people live closer to livestock farms, compared to people who live further away. Acute somatic and mental health symptoms such as headache, sleep problems and anxiety can also be directly or indirectly associated with environmental exposures, especially in the light of recent zoonoses with a severe impact on human health.

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