Paradoxes and parallels in the global distribution of trauma-related mental health problems

What the chapters of this book have in common is that they explore cultural aspects of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD); however the current chapter is slightly different because of its emphasis on cross-national patterns and the relevance of country-level factors that turn out to be risk and protective factors themselves.

Empowering young people who experienced domestic violence and abuse : The development of a group therapy intervention

This article describes the development of a group-based therapeutic intervention for young people (YP) who have lived with domestic violence and abuse. The intervention was informed by interviews with 107 YP, focused on their experiences of coping, resilience and agency. The intervention draws on resources from systemic, creative and narrative approaches to group work, and aims to facilitate YP’s expression of distress in a way that recognizes that it is embodied, contextual and relational.

Trauma-Focused Art Therapy in the Treatment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder : A Pilot Study

Research showed that more than 30% of patients with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) do not benefit from evidence-based treatments: Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) or Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR). These are patients with prolonged and multiple traumatization, with poor verbal memory, and patients with emotional over-modulation. Retelling traumatic experiences in detail is poorly tolerated by these patients and might be a reason for not starting or not completing the recommended treatments.

Secondary traumatization, relationship problems, and adult children’s wellbeing : Long-term effects of World War II in the Netherlands

The hypothesis of secondary traumatization argues that children raised by parents who were traumatized by war, have more mental health problems than other children. Past evidence for this hypothesis is not consistent.

Social capital interventions in public health : A systematic review

Despite two decades of research on social capital and health, intervention studies remain scarce. We performed a systematic review on social capital interventions in public health and searched the Pubmed and PsychInfo databases. The majority of interventions we identified focused on individual level change (e.g. encouraging social participation), as opposed to community level change.

Ruminative and Dampening Responses to Positive Affect in Bipolar Disorder and Major Depressive Disorder

Background
Although previous research has focused on distinguishing cognitive styles between Bipolar Disorder (BD) and Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), little is known about differences in positive affect regulation between these affective groups. The aim of the present study was to extend previous research by investigating such differences between BD and MDD, and between the bipolar subtypes (BD-I vs. BD-II and predominant polarities), using large, clinical, outpatient samples.

 

Top-down and bottom-up control of stress-coping

In this 30th anniversary issue review, we focus on the glucocorticoid modulation of limbic-prefrontocortical circuitry during stress-coping. This action of the stress hormone is mediated by mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) and glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) that are co-expressed abundantly in these higher brain regions.

Compassionate care provision : an immense need during the refugee crisis : lessons learned from a European capacity-building project

Background:

The refugee crisis has resulted in massive waves of migration towards Europe. Besides sufficient and appropriate healthcare services, these vulnerable populations need kindness, respect, acceptance, empathy, and attention to basic needs. Healthcare professionals ought to have a respectful and compassionate approach to safeguard the dignity and interests of the people they care for.

 

Aim:

Disaster Exercises to Prepare Hospitals for Mass-Casualty Incidents : Does it Contribute to Preparedness or is it Ritualism?

Introduction
The central question this study sought to answer was whether the team members of Strategic Crisis Teams (SCTs) participating in mass-casualty incident (MCI) exercises in the Netherlands learn from their participation.

 

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