Survivor guilt : a cognitive approach

Survivor guilt is a common experience following traumatic events in which others have died. However, little research has addressed the phenomenology of survivor guilt, nor has the issue been conceptualised using contemporary psychological models which would help guide clinicians in effective treatment approaches for this distressing problem. This paper summarises the current survivor guilt research literature and psychological models from related areas, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, moral injury and traumatic bereavement.

Own soul's warning: Moral injury, suicidal ideation, and meaning in life.

Objective: Moral injury (an inner conflict [or cognitive dissonance] used to describe psychological, ethical, and/or spiritual conflict experienced when an individual’s basic sense of humanity is violated) has been associated with suicidal ideation among military populations. However, mechanisms linking moral injury to suicidal ideation, particularly variables that may protect against suicidal ideation, have received limited attention.

Brief Eclectic Psychotherapy for Moral Trauma (BEP-MT) : treatment protocol description and a case study

ABSTRACT

Background: Traumatic events can be related to severe transgressions or violations of moral boundaries. Moral injury (MI) has been described as ‘the lasting psychological, biological, spiritual, behavioral and social impact of perpetrating, failing to prevent, or bearing witness to acts that transgress deeply held moral beliefs and expectations.’ These events can provoke emotions such as remorse, guilt and shame, and affects someone’s self-image and identity.

 

Breaking the Chain of Command : Toward a theoretical framework : Explaining how and why soldiers disobey illegal order

Soldiers who receive an illegal order find themselves in a dilemma: they must make a choice between refusing to obey their superior or committing a crime. This study takes a multidisciplinary approach to better understand and explain how and why soldiers refuse to obey illegal orders for conscientious reasons. The study aims at contributing to the academic community by proposing a novel theoretical framework that includes examining factors in three interactive dimensions.

 

Do Service Dogs for Veterans with PTSD Mount a Cortisol Response in Response to Training?

Simple Summary: A growing number of people are supported by specialized service dogs. These dogs are highly trained to improve human welfare, yet not much is known about their own welfare. One of the ways in which welfare can be measured is through the expression of stress via the hormone cortisol. In this study, we investigated the level of cortisol in saliva, a measure for physiological stress, in 19 service dogs.

Engaging with the Second World War through Digital Gaming : Omgaan met de Tweede Wereldoorlog via Gaming

Hoe wordt de Tweede Wereldoorlog verbeeld en herinnerd in onze hedendaagse samenleving? Naar die vraag is er de afgelopen decennia veel onderzoek verricht, ook in Nederland. Daarbij lag de klemtoon vaak op geïnstitutionaliseerde vormen van omgang met de Tweede Wereldoorlog, via (nationale) herdenkingen, monumenten, tentoonstellingen en het onderwijs.

Cognitive Therapy for Moral Injury in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Moral injury is the profound psychological distress which can arise following participating in, or witnessing, events which transgress an individual’s morals and include harming, betraying, or failure to help others, or being subjected to such events, e.g. being betrayed by leaders. It has been primarily researched in the military, but it also found in other professionals such as healthcare workers coping with the COVID-19 pandemic and civilians following a wide range of traumas.

 

Screening for moral injury and comparatively evaluating moral injury measures in relation to mental illness symptomatology and diagnosis

Moral injury merits further study to clarify its identification, prevalence, assessment and intersection with psychosocial and psychiatric problems. The present study investigated the screening potential of the Brief Moral Injury Screen (BMIS) in a sample of post‐9/11 veterans (N = 315) and comparatively evaluated how this tool, the Moral Injury Events Scale (MIES), and the Moral Injury Questionnaire‐Military Version (MIQ‐M) relate to psychiatric diagnoses and mental illness symptom severity.

 

Arts of healing : Cultural narratives of trauma.

This book proposes a return to the resources of the humanities in an attempt to investigate, reflect on, remember or imagine old and new arts of healing at the intersection of critical and cultural theory, psychoanalysis, philosophy, neurology, literature, the visual arts, film studies and gender and queer studies. It interrogates any understanding of healing as the restoration of a lost wholeness, the end of subjective or communal crisis, the retrieval of personal or national sovereignty.

 

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