Who were the Roma victims of the Nazis? A case study of Estonia

This article documents the mass murder of the Roma community in Nazi-occupied Estonia. Using the statistical data assembled by the police, it paints a collective picture of the minority destroyed.

 

The politics of apology : semantic completeness, memory, and identity in French reconciliation policy to Algeria

Political apologies are increasingly common between former colonizer and colonized nations, but remain contentious as a policy and ambiguous in effectiveness at easing disputes. Between France and Algeria, reconciliation and apologies are actively being pursued, yet bilateral tensions are still high. According to research, apologies must meet specific criteria to be accepted, including semantic completeness. Apologies may also have discourses of memory and identity that attempt to repaint the identity of the perpetrator more favorably.

"Remembering the Second World War in Belgium and Britain : comparing the educational role of museums"

Passing on the memory of the Second World War to future generations has always been highly important to prevent the resurgence of such event. As a result of growing international tensions and the gradual disappearance of first-hand witnesses, this need became crucial in recent years. Several studies have been conducted on the commemoration of the Second World War in Belgium and England, but none of them compares the situation in the two countries.

The effects of child encounters during military deployments on the well-being of military personnel : a systematic review

Background: Military members report higher instances of trauma exposure and subsequent posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) relative to civilians. Encounters with children in war and conflict settings may have particularly unsettling consequences. However, the nature of these consequences has yet to be systematically examined.

 

Development of an intervention for moral injury-related mental health difficulties in UK military veterans : a feasibility pilot study protocol

Background: Experiencing potentially morally injurious events (PMIEs) has been found to be significantly associated with poor mental health outcomes in military personnel/veterans. Currently, no manualised treatment for moral injury-related mental health difficulties for UK veterans exists. This article describes the design, methods and expected data collection of the Restore & Rebuild (R&R) protocol, which aims to develop procedures to treat moral injury related mental ill health informed by a codesign approach.

 

Development of an online supportive treatment module for moral injury in military veterans and police officers

Background: Military members and police officers often operate in high stakes situations and under high levels of physical and psychological stress. Consequently, they may be confronted with morally injurious experiences and develop moral injury. Most treatments for moral injury are cognitive-behavioral, face-to-face treatments, which may be supported by online interventions. Online interventions have shown promise in the treatment of trauma-related psychopathology, but few such interventions for moral injury yet exist.

 

Nature videos for PTSD : protocol for a mixed-methods feasibility study

Background: Given the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), particularly among military personnel, new treatment approaches are needed. One may be virtual relaxation interventions, especially 360-degree nature videos, since studies have demonstrated their relaxation effects for healthy participants. If these relaxation effects can be reproduced in patients with PTSD, they may offer a viable tool to reduce distress and hyperarousal.

 

Afterwards—Forgetting, Remembering, Transmitting : Extreme Trauma and Culture in Post-National-Socialist Germany

Facing the rupture the Shoah marks in the history of humanity and in the life of survivors and their relatives, this article approaches long-term psychosocial consequences—after Auschwitz. The dimensions of “forgetting” in post-Nazi Germany are brought into focus by the remembering and passing on of extreme traumatic experiences of persecution.

 

Women's experiences of infertility after the Holocaust

Nuremburg trial evidence demonstrated that Nazis sought methods of mass sterilization of Jewish women. Immediately upon arrival at the concentration camps, over 98% of women stopped menstruating. There has been minimal investigation as to the cause(s) of amenorrhea, beyond malnutrition and trauma.

 

The impact of morally injurious events in a refugee sample : A quantitative and qualitative study.

Background: Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is often reported by refugees that faced violence and persecution. Some stressful events may also entail moral conflicts or dilemmas, described as “potentially morally injurious events” (PMIE). Very few studies have yet investigated the nature of these PMIEs in traumatized refugees, using both quantitative and qualitative data.

 

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