After the strike : Exposing the civilian harm effects of the 2015 Dutch airstrike on Hawija

Executive summary

On the night of 2-3 June 2015, two Dutch F-16s targeted a factory for vehicle-borne improvised explosive devices (VBIEDs) in use by the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) in the city of Hawija, Iraq. The strike was carried out as part of Operation Inherent Resolve (OIR) and the larger US-led Coalition against ISIS. The airstrike caused a large secondary explosion which resulted in the destruction of a major share of the industrial neighbourhood of Hawija and led to severe civilian harm.

 

Relating to moral injuries : Dutch mental health practitioners on moral injury among military and police workers

In recent years the concept of moral injury has become a common term to describe the lasting impact of moral transgressions on frontline workers. This article aims to broaden the largely clinical debate by involving the views of a diverse group of mental health practitioners who support military and police personnel in the Netherlands. These practitioners are chaplains, confidential counsellors, social workers, psychologists and integrity officers. How do these practitioners describe the moral injuries of servicemen and police officers and how do they think these should be approached?

Contextual dimensions of moral injury : An interdisciplinary review

The concept of moral injury, referring to the psychological impact of having one’s moral expectations and beliefs violated, is gaining a firm place in research on military trauma. Yet, although moral injury has the recognized potential to extend the understanding of trauma beyond the individualizing and pathologizing focus of the clinical realm, most studies nevertheless focus on clinical assessment, diagnosis and treatment.

 

Warnings against romanticising moral injury

Interest in the concept of moral injury among researchers, clinicians and policy makers can have undesirable consequences that are rarely considered. It can lead to misunderstanding of post-traumatic stress disorder, risks of primary and secondary gains for affected individuals and tertiary gains for third parties. This editorial calls for critical assessment of this sensitive matter.

 

 

On The Im/Possibility of Mourning the Holocaust

This meditation on the nature of transgenerational transmission of Holocaust trauma and the possibility/impossibility of mourning the Holocaust was triggered, like the residue of a waking dream, by the author’s chance encounter with a private, intimate moment.

 

Agents of memory in the post-witness era : Memory in the Living Room and changing forms of Holocaust remembrance in Israel

With the passing of the survivors of the Holocaust and the aging of the second generation, new agents and initiatives are transforming the commemorative landscape of Holocaust remembrance. This article examines the impact of this generational transition on the production of collective memory of the Holocaust with focus on a new remembrance project in Israel, known as Memory in the Living Room. While some attention has been paid to its innovative structure and anti-paradigmatic components, none has focused on its agents and their mnemonic agenda.

 

Intergenerational transmission of World War II family historical memories of the Resistance

Collective memory of historical events can be transmitted across generations not only through cultural memory but also through communicative memory; that is, transmitted by people who have lived through these particular times. Yet, few studies have examined the temporal horizon of a particular type of communicative memory: family historical memories. In this article, we examine the intergenerational transmission of memories from the Second World War in families with an ancestor who resisted during the German Occupation.

The post-war generation remembers : A mixed-method study exploring children’s attitudes towards World War II commemoration

This study investigated how children, a post-war generation without direct connection to war, relate to the commemoration of World War II (WWII). Seven group interviews were held among pupils in the Netherlands, aged 9 to 18 (n = 55) and, subsequently, questionnaires
were administered to other pupils (n = 374).

 

When the Village Gets Bombed : Parenting in the Aftermath of War and Refuge

This dissertation aimed to unravel how parenting practices take shape in the aftermath of war and refuge. A mixed-methods systematic review and meta-analysis using meta-analytical structural equation model (MASEM; k = 38, N = 55,000) showed that war-exposure casts its effects on children’s internalizing and externalizing problems partly directly, and partly indirectly through reduced parental warmth and increased harshness, but not through reduced or increased behavioral control.

Breaking the Chain of Command : Toward a theoretical framework : Explaining how and why soldiers disobey illegal order

Soldiers who receive an illegal order find themselves in a dilemma: they must make a choice between refusing to obey their superior or committing a crime. This study takes a multidisciplinary approach to better understand and explain how and why soldiers refuse to obey illegal orders for conscientious reasons. The study aims at contributing to the academic community by proposing a novel theoretical framework that includes examining factors in three interactive dimensions.

 

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