Chapter : Mobilizing resources in multifamily groups

Refugees and asylum seekers exposed to cumulative stress due to organized violence, forced migration and then lengthy asylum procedures have a significant risk of suffering from a number of serious complaints. This chapter describes a systemic approach to prevention and psychosocial interventions for traumatized refugee families that has been developed in the authors' institute.

Trauma-focused treatments for refugee children : study protocol for a randomized controlled trial of the effectiveness of KIDNET versus EMDR therapy versus a waitlist control group (KIEM)

Background: Prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in refugees is reportedly higher in comparison to the general population. Refugee children specifically are often coping with trauma and loss and are at risk for mental health difficulties. With staggering numbers of people seeking refuge around the world and 50% being 18 years or younger, research examining the effects of trauma-focused therapies for refugee children with PTSD is highly needed.

Prevalence of common mental disorders in adult Syrian refugees resettled in high income Western countries : a systematic review and meta-analysis

Background
The immense social upheaval and ongoing humanitarian crisis created by the 2011 war in Syria has forced millions of civilians to flee their homeland, many of whom seek refugee status in Western nations. Whilst it is known that the prevalence of mental illness is higher within refugee populations, this systematic review and meta-analysis aims to pool the prevalence rates of common mental disorders (namely posttraumatic stress disorder, depression and generalized anxiety disorder) in adult Syrian refugees resettled in high income Western countries.

Effectiveness of a WHO self-help psychological intervention for preventing mental disorders among Syrian refugees in Turkey : a randomized controlled trial

Refugees are at high risk of developing mental disorders. There is no evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that psychological interventions can prevent the onset of mental disorders in this group. We assessed the effectiveness of a self-help psychological intervention developed by the World Health Organization, called Self-Help Plus, in preventing the development of mental disorders among Syrian refugees experiencing psychological distress in Turkey. A two-arm, assessor-masked RCT was conducted in two Turkish areas.

Attachment insecurity in unaccompanied refugees : a longitudinal study

Purpose
This study aims to focus on the avoidance and anxiety attachment patterns among unaccompanied refugee minors (URMs) after resettlement in Norway. The authors explored the extent of stability and change in these attachment patterns and the role of demographic and interpersonal predictors of change in levels of attachment insecurity.

 

Building youth and family resilience for better mental health : developing and testing a hybrid model of intervention in low- and middle-income countries

Resilience is a dynamic, multi-level, multi-systemic process of positive adaptation at the individual, family and community levels. Promoting resilience can be a cost-effective form of preventive and early intervention, offering significant health advantages for young people  throughout their lives.

 

Course and predictors of posttraumatic stress and depression longitudinal symptom profiles in refugees : A latent transition model

Exposure to potentially traumatic events and post-migration living difficulties (PMLDs) may explain the high rates of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression in resettled refugees. Latent class analyses (LCAs) in refugees have identified subgroups that differ in symptom profiles of PTSD and comorbid symptoms. However, knowledge on longitudinal symptom profiles in refugees is sparse. Examining longitudinal PTSD and depression symptom profiles could provide information on risk factors underlying worsening of symptoms post-resettlement.

Pain and Somatic Symptoms in Tortured Refugees : A Clinical Survey

Torture may be associated with long-lasting somatic symptoms, only partly explained by physical injuries. Physical pain as a result of torture may seriously complicate the diagnostics and treatment of posttraumatic pathology in refugees. The question whether a relation exists between the experience of torture and the extent of reported medically unexplained physical symptoms, is therefore highly relevant. We firstly hypothesized that refugees who underwent torture will report more somatic symptoms, as operationalized by experienced pain, than refugees without a history of torture.

On The Im/Possibility of Mourning the Holocaust

This meditation on the nature of transgenerational transmission of Holocaust trauma and the possibility/impossibility of mourning the Holocaust was triggered, like the residue of a waking dream, by the author’s chance encounter with a private, intimate moment.

 

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