The nexus between conflict-related sexual violence and trafficking for sexual exploitation in times of conflict

In its 2018 report on conflict-related sexual violence the UN Secretary-General reiterated the importance of addressing the nexus between conflict-related sexual violence and trafficking in human beings for purposes of sexual exploitation in conflict. In this article we will explore this nexus from a psychological and a legal point of view. During conflict the climate of impunity and the extreme contrast between the mighty and the powerless offers an optimal setting and inevitable ground for sexual violence.

Translations of our mental health information

Please see below translated versions of our mental health information.

Arabic عربى
Bengali বাঙালি
Bulgarian
Chinese 中文
French Francais 
German Auf Deutsch 
Greek Ελληνική γλώσσα
Gujurati  ગુજરાતી
Hindi हिंदीहिंदी
Italian Italiano
Japanese  日本語
Lithuanian Lietuvių kalba
Pashto پښتو
Persian (Farsi) فارسی
Polish Polski
Punjabi ਪੰਜਾਬੀ
Romanian Romana
Russian Pусский
Somali
Spanish Espanol
Tamil தமிழ்
Turkish
Urdu اردو
Welsh Cymraeg

Self-Help Resources in Farsi

The Multicultural Mental Health Resource Centre (MMHRC) seeks to improve the quality and availability of mental health services for people from diverse cultural and ethnic backgrounds, including immigrants, refugees, and members of established ethnocultural communities.

Paradoxes and parallels in the global distribution of trauma-related mental health problems

What the chapters of this book have in common is that they explore cultural aspects of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD); however the current chapter is slightly different because of its emphasis on cross-national patterns and the relevance of country-level factors that turn out to be risk and protective factors themselves.

Reflecting the potential role of family counselling in addressing emotional issues in Afghan youth

Working with family conflicts can be a challenging task for counsellors. In a collectivist society, such as Afghanistan, where interactions between people of the opposite sex are highly regulated, counselling sessions with an individual involved in a family conflict may not be very effective unless conducted in a culturally sensitive manner. As asking for help from professionals may be considered to be ‘lunatic’, as well as a potential threat to the honour of the family, family counselling is not often easy to carry out and may actually pose risks to the client and to the counsellor.

Witnessing the vulnerabilities and capabilities of one Afghan woman: Cultural values as a source of resilience in daily life

This personal reflection on my daily interactions with an Afghan woman, Bibi Hawa, aims to describe how I witnessed her psychological distress, partly manifested as chest pain, and her resilience to this distress in a particular Afghan socio-cultural and political context. My reflections shed light on the importance of finding a space in which resilience can be built.

Active coping with trauma and domestic violence: How Afghan women survive

This personal reflection examines the author’s experience while conducting qualitative research on the traumatic life events and coping among the female workers in Kabul University’s dormitory for female students. It also describes the experiences of one of the study’s participants, a woman who suffered from severe domestic violence and enacted various ways of active coping.

Starting as a counsellor

Girls living in juvenile rehabilitation centres, especially as a consequence of escaping from home or sexual contact, can be difficult to engage in counselling sessions. Often, this can be related to the idea that help seeking from a psychologist or counsellor is equivalent to being labelled as ‘crazy’. Added to that is the belief that family secrets must stay at home, so girls feel uncomfortable speaking about their problems. As a result, counsellors’ attempts may lead to failure. This personal reflection shows the author’s first experiences working with clients.

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