The mental health effects of visa insecurity for refugees and people seeking asylum: a latent class analysis

Objectives

Current regional conflicts are creating a surge in forced migration, and heightened visa restrictions are increasingly being applied. The current study aimed to examine the relationship between visa insecurity and psychological outcomes within a large clinical sample of refugees and people seeking asylum in Australia.

Methods

Mind the Mind Now Conference Special 7 & 8 october 2019

On 7 and 8 October 2019, Minister for Foreign Trade and Development Cooperation Sigrid Kaag hosted the first International Conference on Mental Health and Psychosocial Support (MHPSS)  in Crisis Situations in Amsterdam. During this conference, a special ‘magazine’ was made, containing stories, interviews, pictures and tweets related to the topic and the event.

2 TWEETS OF THE DAY #mindthemindnow

4 PREFACE Minister Sigrid Kaag

6 INFOGRAPHIC MHPSS in the world

7 VOICES FROM THE FIELD Aweng Chuol

8 DECLARATION mind the mind now

The culture, mental health and psychosocial wellbeing of Rohingya refugees : a systematic review

Aims. Despite the magnitude and protracted nature of the Rohingya refugee situation, there is limited information on the culture, mental health and psychosocial wellbeing of this group. This paper, drawing on a report commissioned by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), aims to provide a comprehensive synthesis of the literature on mental health and psychosocial wellbeing of Rohingya refugees, including an examination of associated cultural factors.

Mind the mind now: International Conference on Mental Health & Psychosocial Support in Crisis Situation 2019 Background Document and Recommendations

This booklet contains documentation in support of the in-depth breakout sessions at the International Conference on Mental Health and Psychosocial Support (MHPSS) in Crisis Situations, 7-8 October 2019 in Amsterdam. For each breakout topic, invited experts have prepared a background paper with recommendations to inform conference participants.

 

Mini-feature Towards understanding and addressing the root causes of displacement

This mini-feature has been prepared to inform discussions at the first Global Refugee Forum in December 2019. The seven articles have been published as part of Forced Migration Review issue 62 on ‘Return’.

Return: voluntary, safe, dignified and durable?

Voluntary return in safety and with dignity has long been a core tenet of the international refugee regime. In the 23 articles on ‘Return’ in this issue of FMR, authors explore various obstacles to achieving sustainable return, discuss the need to guard against premature or forced return, and debate the assumptions and perceptions that influence policy and practice. This issue also includes a mini-feature on ‘Towards understanding and addressing the root causes of displacement’.

7ROSES, a transdiagnostic intervention for promoting self-efficacy in traumatized refugees: a first quantitative evaluation

Objective: Due to traumatic experiences and highly prevalent post-migration stressors, refugees are vulnerable for developing psychopathology. To date, research has mainly evaluated trauma-focused therapies, targeting post traumatic stresss symptoms. Treatments targeting post-migration stressors are relatively understudied. The present cohort study evaluated the potential effectiveness of 7ROSES, a transdiagnostic intervention that aims to increase self-efficacy among treatment-seeking refugees in dealing with postmigration stressors.

Undocumented asylum seekers with posttraumatic stress disorder in the Netherlands

Background: To date, most studies on the mental health of refugees in Europe have focused on the prevalence and treatment of psychopathology. Little is known about those who illegally reside in the host country, referred to, in the Netherlands, as undocumented asylum seekers. There are indications that mental health and psychosocial problems are more prevalent in this group than among refugees in general, with unsatisfactory treatment outcomes.

Early discontinuation of counselling by survivors of family violence in Papua New Guinea

Family and sexual violence are common and widespread in Papua New Guinea, especially against women. The author describes her reflections about reviewing the psychosocial support mode of intervention according to the needs of survivors of family violence at the Family Support Centre within Tari Hospital in the southern highlands of the Hela Province, while working as a psychologist supervisor from 2011 to 2012. It draws on a feedback exercise with survivors, intended to ask about their satisfaction with services and the reasons for not returning for follow-up counselling sessions.

Psychological first aid for children during the Kumamoto earthquake disaster response in Japan

The following field report is based on lessons learned from the adaptation and utilisation of the Psychological First Aid for Child Practitioners (Save the Children, 2013) materials in Japan. Psychological first aid (PFA) is a set of skills and competencies that help reduce the initial distress of children and caregivers due to accidents, natural disasters, conflicts or other critical incidents. The manual was developed by Save the Children based on Psychological First Aid: A Guide for Field Workers (World Health Organization, War Trauma Foundation and World Vision International, 2011).

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