“Our Religion is on Us, Like How Our Parents Raised Us” : The Role of Islam and Spirituality in the Lives of Syrian Refugee Caregivers

This study addresses two distinct but interwoven questions on the link between spirituality and religion in the lives of Syrian Muslim refugee parents. (1) How do religious and spiritual convictions impact these refugees and their families? (2) How do these convictions shape Syrian Muslim refugee parents’ own positionality as caregivers and as individuals?

Parental post-traumatic stress and psychiatric care utilisation among refugee adolescents

Parental psychiatric morbidity related to experiences of war and trauma has been associated with adverse psychological outcomes for children. The aim of this study was to investigate parental post-traumatic stress in relation to psychiatric care utilization among children of refugees with particular attention on the child’s own refugee status, sex of both child and parents, and specific psychiatric diagnoses.

 

Explaining psychosocial care among unaccompanied minor refugees : a realist review

Research on the psychosocial care (PSC) of unaccompanied minor refugees (UMRs) has mainly taken a socioepidemiological approach and has focused on the perspectives of experts in the field. In contrast, the knowledge concerning the differing context factors and the underlying mechanisms of current PSC which could inform policy recommendations is scant.

 

The Syrian regime’s apparatus for systemic torture : A qualitative narrative study of testimonies from survivors

Background
Despite broad interest of the Syrian refugee plight in the academic and media circles, there are still limited studies analyzing the lived experiences of torture survivors under the Syrian regime. This qualitative study interviewed torture survivors to examine the form and function of the Syrian regime’s security apparatus, and the personal aftermath of survivors.

Ritual (Re)design : Towards a Framework for Professional Ritual Making in Postsecular Contexts

Ritualizing, the creative, imaginative, and intuitive act of ritual making has been acknowledged for some time now in the literature. In this study, this intuitive process is studied in more detail from the perspective of ritual theory. The aim is to theoretically strengthen a framework of ritual making for professionals, such as chaplains and celebrants working with renewed rituals.

Groupwork with Refugees and Survivors of Human Rights Abuses : The Power of Togetherness

Drawing on multiple theoretical approaches, the book features chapters from practitioners running groups in different settings, such as torture rehabilitation services, refugee camps, and reception centres. The voices of participants demonstrate the variety, creativity, and value of group and community approaches for recovery. The editors have gathered chapters into three sections covering: community-based approaches; groups that work through the medium of "body and soul"; and group approaches that focus on change through the spoken word.

 

Assessment of mental health of university students faced with different lockdowns during the coronavirus pandemic, a repeated cross-sectional study

Background: Studies have highlighted the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the mental health of university students. However, little is known about the psychological impact of successive lockdowns on this population.

 

Objectives: To assess the prevalence of psychological distress in a student population during the first two lockdowns linked to the COVID-19 pandemic, and to stratify them by subgroup.

 

Adversity, emotion, and resilience among Syrian refugees in the Netherlands

Background
Syrian refugees comprise the vast majority of refugees in the Netherlands. Although some research has been carried out on factors promoting refugee resilience, there have been few empirical studies on the resilience of Syrian refugees.

 

Method
We used a qualitative method to understand adversity, emotion, and the factors contributing to resilience in Syrian refugees. We interviewed eighteen adult Syrian refugees residing in the Netherlands and used thematic analysis to identify the themes.

 

Cognitive Processing Therapy for the Treatment of PTSD, Depression and Anxiety in Syrian Refugees in Egypt

The purpose of this study is to examine the efficacy of cognitive processing therapy (CPT) in treating posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression and anxiety among Syrian refugees who have experienced war trauma. Clinicians interviewed 94 patients and asked them to complete the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale three times: pretreatment, posttreatment and at the 12-month follow-up. In addition, PTSD, depression and anxiety were assessed using the PTSD Checklist, Beck Depression Inventory and Beck Anxiety Inventory at pretreatment, weekly, posttreatment and 12-month follow-up.

“Doing What Matters in Times of Stress” to Decrease Psychological Distress During COVID-19 : A Randomised Controlled Pilot Trial

Despite the increasing psychological distress during COVID-19, utilisation of face-to-face psychological interventions decreased profoundly. The aim of this study involving two parallel, two-armed pilot randomised controlled trials was to examine the effectiveness of a guided self-help intervention “Doing What Matters in Times of Stress” (DWM) in decreasing psychological distress in Turkish and Syrian participants. Seventy-four Turkish nationals and 50 Syrian refugee adults with psychological distress were randomly allocated to a DWM group or wait-list control group.

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