Overcoming barriers to mental health care : multimodal trauma‑focused treatment approach for unaccompanied refugee minors

Background: This study evaluated the feasibility of a short-term, multimodal trauma-focused treatment approach adapted specifically for unaccompanied refugee minors (URMs) in the Netherlands. This approach aims to overcome barriers to mental health care and to reduce symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression.

 

Feasibility and acceptability of Problem Management Plus with Emotional Processing (PM +EP) for refugee youth living in the Netherlands : study protocol

Background: Refugee youth experience hardships associated with exposure to trauma in their homelands and during and after displacement, which results in higher rates of common mental disorders. The World Health Organization (WHO) developed Problem Management Plus (PM+), a non-specialist-delivered brief psychological intervention, for individuals who have faced adversity. PM+ comprises problem-solving, stress management, behavioural activation and strengthening social support.

Dropout from psychological interventions for refugees and asylum seekers : A meta-analysis.

Background: Refugees and asylum seekers often suffer from migration stressors and related psychopathology. However, providing this population with psychological treatment has a number of barriers (e.g., culture and language differences), which are widely thought to hinder the success and continuation of treatment.

 

Objective: The current systematic review and meta-analysis aims to provide first comprehensive evidence on the prevalence and predictors of dropout in treatment provided for refugees and asylum seekers.

 

Barriers, Attitudes, Confidence and Knowledge of Mental Health and Psychosocial Humanitarian Staff in Cox’s Bazar in Responding to Suicide Risk

Although suicide is a significant global health priority, it is underexamined in humanitarian crises. Over 850,000 Rohingya reside as refugees in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh; suicide risk may be high in this community by some indicators, but little is definitively known. Even less is known about humanitarian workers’ capacity to recognise and respond to suicide risk in affected communities.

Programming to Address Suicidal Behaviour among Unaccompanied Refugee Minors in a Camp Setting: A Field Report from Ethiopia

In response to a perceived increase in suicidal ideation and behaviour among minors and especially unaccompanied and separated children (UASC) in camps for Eritrean refugees in Ethiopia, we developed a multilayered response programme. This programme included public awareness and stigma-reduction campaigns, psychoeducation aimed at both UASC and their caregivers, capacity building for humanitarian and community partners, group and individual counselling for UASC and crisis response and postvention.

 

Despair and Suicide-Related Behaviours in Palorinya Refugee Settlement, Moyo, Uganda

This descriptive study illustrates the multitude of intertwining factors contributing to suicidal ideation and attempts, and deaths by suicide among South Sudanese refugees in Moyo/Obongi Palorinya settlements in northern Uganda. It was conducted from 2019 to 2020 due to escalating rates of suicide attempts and deaths by suicide noted in a rapid assessment by Lutheran World Federation mental health and psychosocial support (MHPSS) workers.

Waiting for Life to Begin, Wishing it Would End : Suicidal Ideation among Newly Arrived Refugees

Research indicates that subgroups of refugees may be at increased risk for suicidal ideation, but further knowledge on this topic is needed. This study aimed to assess both prevalence and factors associated with suicidal ideation among newly arrived refugees in Sweden. Assessing suicidal ideation was part of a larger project, aiming to develop a model for assessment and treatment of mental health problems among refugees. The included data were based on a cross-sectional survey among 510 asylum seekers and refugees, all under the care of the Swedish Migration Agency.

 

A Preliminary Framework for Understanding Suicide Risk in LGBTQ Refugees and Asylum Seekers

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer/questioning (LGBTQ) individuals continue to experience pervasive violence and victimisation, which has been associated with a host of negative mental health problems, including suicide. However, there is a gap in knowledge about LGBTQ refugees and asylum seekers, an especially vulnerable subgroup of both the LGBTQ and refugee/asylum seeker population.

Training Survivors of Gender-Based Violence in the Problem Management Plus Programme in Turkey

Since the beginning of the Syrian conflict, the impact on the local population has rapidly increased, with severe consequent displacement to neighbouring countries (such as Turkey), material losses and psychological damage due to witnessing death, torture, physical and psychological abuse or surviving it, including high levels of gender-based violence.

 

Using clinical expertise and empirical data in constructing networks of trauma symptoms in refugee youth

Background: In recent years, many adolescents have fled their home countries due to war and human rights violations, consequently experiencing various traumatic events and putting them at risk of developing mental health problems. The symptomatology of refugee youth was shown to be multifaceted and often falling outside of traditional diagnoses.

 

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