ARQ Centre of Expertise for War, Persecution and Violence

English

Ritual in Therapy for Prolonged Grief : A Scoping Review of Ritual Elements in Evidence-Informed Grief Interventions

The aim of this article of to analyze ritual in evidence-informed treatments for prolonged and traumatic grief. A scoping review is conducted in order to give an overview of existing literature on ritual and symbolic interventions in grief therapies for prolonged grief and the type of evidence supporting these interventions. The 22 studies reported in this review reveal a variety of ritual elements ranging from symbolic expression and interaction, writing assignments, dialogue with the deceased or an imaginary person, to farewell ceremonies at the end of the treatment.

Commemoration of disruptive events : a scoping review about posttraumatic stress reactions and related factors

Collective commemoration in response to war or disaster is widespread across time and cultures. It is assumed to support those affected by the disruptive event to cope with their experiences. However, the actual relationship between commemoration and mental health outcomes is complicated and evidence of healing effects remains elusive.

 

Facilitating grief : An exploration of the function of funerals and rituals in relation to grief reactions

The loss of a loved one through death is usually followed by a funeral and engagement in various grief rituals. We examined the association between the evaluation of the  uneral, the use of grief rituals and grief reactions. Bereaved individuals from the Netherlands completed questionnaires, six months and three years post-loss (n=552/289).

Taking Action : What We Can Learn From Resistance

In this long read, we will investigate how people shape their behaviour in an authoritarian society.

When do they adapt, and when do they think things go too far? What do they consider to be opportunities, or as too much of a risk? To what extent are they prepared (or not) to adjust their previous ideas about right and wrong?

Primarily using examples from the period immediately before and after the Second World War, but also from later in the twentieth century, we look for the small everyday negotiations of people in authoritarian systems, and what we can learn from them.