Adapting Problem Management Plus for Implementation : Lessons Learned from Public Sector Settings Across Rwanda, Peru, Mexico and Malawi

Problem Management Plus (PM+) is a low-intensity psychological intervention developed by the World Health Organization that can be delivered by nonspecialists to address common mental health conditions in people affected by adversity. Emerging evidence demonstrates the efficacy of PM+ across a range of settings.

 

However, the published literature rarely documents the adaptation processes for psychological interventions to context or culture, including curriculum or implementation adaptations. Practical guidance for adapting PM+ to context while maintaining fidelity to core psychological elements is essential for mental health implementers to enable replication and scale. This paper describes the process of contextually adapting PM+ for implementation in Rwanda, Peru, Mexico and Malawi undertaken by the international nongovernmental organisation Partners In Health.

 

To our knowledge,thisinitiativeis amongthe first to adapt PM+ for routine delivery across multiple public sector primary care and community settings in partnership with Ministries of Health. Lessons learned contribute to a broader understanding of effective processes for adapting low-intensity psychological interventions to real-world contexts.

Reference: 
Sarah F. Coleman, Hildegarde Mukasakindi, Alexandra L. Rose, Jerome T. Galea, Beatha Nyirandagijimana, Janvier Hakizimana, Robert Bienvenue, Priya Kundu, Eugenie Uwimana, Anathalie Uwamwezi, Carmen Contreras, Fátima G. Rodriguez-Cuevas, Jimena Maza, Todd Ruderman, Emilia Connolly, Mark Chalamanda, Waste Kayira, Kingsley Kazoole, Ksakrad K. Kelly, Jesse H. Wilson, Amruta A. Houde, Elizabeth B. Magill, Giuseppe J. Raviola & Stephanie L. Smith | 2021
In: Intervention ; ISSN : 1571-8883 | 19 | 1 | march | 58-66
https://www.interventionjournal.org/article.asp?issn=1571-8883%3Byear%3D2021%3Bvolume%3D19%3Bissue%3D1%3Bspage%3D58%3Bepage%3D66%3Baulast%3DColeman%3Btype%3D0
Keywords: 
Curriculum, Interventions, Mental health