‘Our NGO family has suffered a tragedy, and we will survive : ’ Evaluating a crisis response intervention with expatriate aid workers in Afghanistan

In 2008, Taliban forces killed four aid workers in Afghanistan. Immediately afterwards, expatriate and national field staff undertook crisis management activities on the ground. While this was a devastating event, field and headquarters staff agreed that the organisational response to the crisis was positive. Nine months later, 19 expatriate staff members involved in the crisis response participated in an evaluation to reflect on personal and organisational factors that contributed to their post crisis resilience.

The role and experience of local faith leaders in promoting child protection : a case study from Malawi

Frequently, community based strategies include engagement with local faith leaders. However, there have been few systematic attempts to document how faith leaders themselves define their roles in these initiatives. This study examined local faith leaders and their spouses, in flood affected areas of Malawi, who had been oriented to child protection issues through World Vision workshops aimed explicitly at relating protection concerns to religious teachings.

Closing the gap between disaster mental health research and practice : evidence for socio-ecological mental health interventions through multilevel research

Socio-ecological interventions assume that there are ‘links’ between the individual process that determines disaster mental health and the social context one lives in. However, there is insufficient empirical basis for this claim. This paper summarises the main findings from a research programme, in which two advanced statistical techniques on data from two floods were applied, respectively Uttar Pradesh, India 2008 and Morpeth, England, 2008.

Vulnerability to heatwaves and implications for public health interventions : A scoping review

 

Abstract

 

Background

Heatwaves form a serious public health threat, especially for vulnerable groups. Interventions such as active outreach programs, exposure reduction measures and monitoring and mapping of at-risk groups are increasingly implemented across the world but little is known about their effect.

Objectives

Measuring and modelling the quality of 40 post-disaster mental health and psychosocial support programmes

Disasters can have an enormous impact on the health and well-being of those affected. Internationally, governments and service providers are often challenged to address complex psychosocial problems. Ideally, the potentially broad range of support activities include a coherent, high-quality mental health and psychosocial support (MHPSS) programme. We present a theory-driven quantitative analysis of the quality of 40 MHPSS programmes, mostly implemented in European disaster settings.

The War on Children : Time to end grave violations against children in conflict

There are approximately 350 million children living in areas affected by conflict today, according to new research carried out by the Peace Research Institute in Oslo (PRIO) for this report.

 

Primary care for refugees and newly arrived migrants in Europe : a qualitative study on health needs, barriers and wishes

Abstract

 

Background
 

In order to provide effective primary care for refugees and to develop interventions tailored to them, we must know their needs. Little is known of the health needs and experiences of recently arrived refugees and other migrants throughout their journey through Europe. We aimed to gain insight into their health needs, barriers in access and wishes regarding primary health care.

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